Overall, it was hard to gauge a consensus of whether arming security guards in Rio Rancho schools was a good idea or bad idea, as applause followed every comment, pro or con, during a two-hour open forum Thursday evening in the Rio Rancho Public Schools district offices.

Five days before its self-imposed deadline to start the process of getting the new Joe Harris Elementary built and open in time for the 2020-21 school year, the Rio Rancho Public Schools Board of Education held a special meeting Thursday evening to finalize the site for the $24.5 million school.

For the first time in recent memory, the Rio Rancho Public Schools Board of Education met with the Rio Rancho Governing Body in a 75-minute workshop session last Wednesday to discuss development in Unit 10.

Changes to the dress code got a reprieve Monday evening during the Rio Rancho Public Schools Board of Education’s two-hour meeting, as board members didn’t believe the current Policy 1016 (formerly 1017) was ready to go.

The Rio Rancho Public Schools Board of Education probably didn’t need any validation of Rio Rancho High School’s championship choir, but board members heard an impromptu concert during their meeting last Monday evening.

Long before last month’s horrific school shooting in Florida and the recent social-media shooting threat leveled at Rio Rancho High School, the wheels were spinning in the City of Vision on how to make schools even safer than they have been.

By a four-to-one verdict, voters in the Rio Rancho Public Schools district overwhelmingly approved the two-mill levy question in Tuesday’s election, with results including early- and absentee-voting.

As the 2017-18 school year began for more than 50 million U.S. students, many districts worried how they would get children to school.

Expecting to level the playing field and make “equal opportunity” mean something when it comes to attending college, the New Mexico Public Education Department, in partnership with Gov. Susana Martinez, has waived $90 of the $93 fee for high school students from low-income families to take A…

There was no proverbial million-dollar question for the Rio Rancho Public Schools Board of Education at its first meeting of 2018 last Monday evening, but there was a million-dollar answer.

“I am a lineman for the county and I drive the main road, Searchin’ in the sun for another overload, I hear you singin’ in the wire, I can hear you through the whine … And the Wichita lineman is still on the line.”

Since the announcement that the University of New Mexico West campus in Rio Rancho was officially a unit of the Health Sciences Center, UNM Sandoval Regional Medical Center CEO Jamie Silva-Steele and her team have been busy making plans for its future.

The Rio Rancho Public Schools Board of Education listened intently and gave its heartfelt, unanimous approval to two programs in the high schools aimed at keeping some at-risk students on track to graduate, instead of dropping out.

Coincidentally, two National Education Association executives representing the New Mexico collective bargaining unit were in Rio Rancho the same day as PED Secretary Christopher Ruszinski.

University of New Mexico West instructor Dr. Laura Burton looked at an empty classroom at the start of the recent fall semester.

Amanda Aragon, a graduate of Rio Rancho High School in 2005, didn’t need any of the trigonometry she learned in Dan Barbour’s class more than a dozen years ago. It’s not necessary in her role as the director of strategic outreach with the state Public Education Department.

In just a few more days, Rio Rancho Public Schools’ Chief Operating Officer Richard Bruce begins what he’s calling his third career.

They’re not sure if the students are excited about starting school Friday, but Sandia Vista Elementary Montessori team teachers Tana Gonzales and Jasmine Stewart are thrilled.

Eight Rio Rancho middle-schoolers had a unique opportunity in mid-June to become entrepreneurs, thanks to Camp Innoventure, a program run by New Mexico State University’s Arrowhead Center for economic development in partnership with the Sandoval Economic Alliance.

Eight Rio Rancho middle schoolers had a unique opportunity this week to become entrepreneurs, thanks to Camp Innoventure, a program run by New Mexico State University’s Arrowhead Center for economic development in partnership with the Sandoval Economic Alliance.

BERNALILLO — The Sandoval County Commission awarded nine Bernalillo High School graduates with the 2016 Sandoval County Comcast Scholarship.

The Rio Rancho High School marching band showed local residents its competition presentation, "Nightmare," composed by Frank Sullivan, during halftime at the RRHS-La Cueva football game Friday evening at Rio Rancho Stadium.

Monday through Friday, seventh-grader Priscilla Salazar wakes up in the morning and gets ready for school. Instead of rushing out the door to catch the school bus, however, she sits at her computer and logs in.

The Rio Rancho school board on Monday voted unanimously to invite New Mexico Public Education Secretary Hanna Skandera to a future meeting to share its frustrations about the state Public Education Department.

Nearly three weeks into the school year, Rio Rancho Public Schools officials told the board they are still struggling to fill vacant positions.

BERNALILLO — More than 100 parents, tribal leaders, city officials and even the state’s secretary of education came out to celebrate the town of Bernalillo’s new high school Friday morning.